Larry Humes

Larry Humes

Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Speech and Hearing Sciences

Education

  • Ph.D., Audiology, Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois, 1979
  • M.A., Audiology, Central Michigan University Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, 1976
  • B.S., Audiology and Speech Sciences and Psychology, Purdue University West Lafayette, Indiana, 1975

About Larry Humes

Larry E. Humes is currently distinguished professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University. Professor Humes has served as associate editor, editor, and editorial board member for several audiology journals. Professor Humes has received the Honors of the Association and the Alfred Kawana Award for Lifetime Achievement in Publications from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the James Jerger Career Award for Research in Audiology and a Presidential Award from the American Academy of Audiology. He is a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America and of the International Collegium on Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA). His most recent research activities have focused on age-related changes in auditory perception, including speech-understanding ability, and on outcome measures for hearing aids.

Selected publications

Humes, L.E. (2015). Age-related changes in cognitive and sensory processing: Focus on middle-aged adults. American Journal of Audiology, 24, 94-97.

Kidd, G. & Humes, L.E. (2015). Keeping track of who said what: Performance on a modified auditory n-back task with young and older adults. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 987 (open access).

Kuchinsky, S.E., Vaden, K.I., Jr., Ahlstrom, J.B., Cute, S.L., Humes, L.E., Dubno, J.R. & Eckert, M.A. (2016). Task-related vigilance during speech recognition in noise for older adults with hearing loss. Experimental Aging Research, 42, 1-23.

Krull, V. & Humes, L.E. (2016). Text as a supplement to speech in young and older adults. Ear and Hearing, 37, 164-176.

Humes, L.E. & Young, L.A. (2016). Sensory-cognitive interactions in older adults. Ear and Hearing, 37, 52S-61S. (open access)

Pichora-Fuller, K., Kramer, S.E., Eckert, M.A., Edwards, B., Hornsby, B., Humes, L.E. et al. (2016). Hearing impairment and cognitive energy: A framework for understanding effortful listening (FUEL). Ear and Hearing, 37, 5S-27S. (open access)

Fogerty, D., Humes, L.E. & Busey, T.A. (2016). Age-related declines in early sensory memory: Identification of rapid auditory and visual stimulus sequences. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 8 (90), 1-16. (open access)

Humes, L.E. & Kidd, G.R. (2016). Speech recognition for multiple bands: Implications for the Speech Intelligibility Index. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 140, 2019-2026.

Humes, L.E. (2016). A retrospective examination of the effect of diabetes on sensory processing in older adults. American Journal of Audiology, 25, 364-367.

Dobie, R. & Humes, L.E. (2016). Noise-induced cochlear neuropathy: Regulatory implications and research needs. International Journal of Audiology, Online 16 Nov 2016, 1-5.

Humes, L.E., Kidd, G.R. & Fogerty, D. (2017). Exploring use of the Coordinate Response Measure in a multi-talker babble paradigm. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 60, 741-754.

Humes, L.E., Rogers, S.E., Quigley, T.M., Main, A.K., Kinney, D.L. & Herring, C.M. (2017). The effects of service-delivery model and purchase price on hearing-aid outcomes in older adults: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. American Journal of Audiology, 26, 53-79.

Humes, L. & Dhar, S. (2017). Trial of an alternate hearing aid delivery model. The Hearing Journal, 70 (4), 10,12.

Humes, L.E., Herring, C., Kinney, D.L., Main, A.K., Quigley, T.M., & Rogers, S.E. (2017). The effectiveness of hearing aids and two service-delivery models in older adults: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Hearing Review, 24(4):12-19.

Humes, L.E. & Dubno, J.R. (2017). Over-the-counter hearing aids: long overdue alternative for millions of Americans. The Hill, published online 7/17/17, 1-3.

Humes, L. (2017). A new twist on hearing aids. Bottom Line Health, 31(8), 8-9.